Flood Editions

Archive for January, 2011|Monthly archive page

Roy Fisher’s Selected Poems

In new titles on January 27, 2011 at 2:13 pm

Roy Fisher’s Selected Poems, edited by August Kleinzahler. ISBN 978-0-9819520-6-2 $15.95. Now available.

Selected Poems presents the remarkable range of Roy Fisher’s restless and exploratory poetry. Stripped of ornament, skeptical in temperament, these poems find music in sharp angles, hesitations, and silences. They often move through post-industrial landscapes of Birmingham and the English Midlands, registering crepuscular half-tones, “the dog odour / of water,” and “malted-milk brickwork.” Beyond such literal subjects, Fisher captures the intermingling of fancy and perception, the play of light and shadow in the mind itself. As Kleinzahler suggests in his foreword to this volume, “The eye darts about in Fisher’s poetry. It abhors the object at rest, framing of any kind. It’s like a camera, jerking and swiveling on an unstable tripod. Early and late, the poetry is about the eye in motion. The shifts may be subtle or vertiginously abrupt. It’s best not to get too comfortable as you progress through a poem because you’re not going to be where you think you are for long.”

 

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The First Decade

In Uncategorized on January 20, 2011 at 1:18 am


Ten years ago this month, Flood Editions published its first title, The Shrubberies by Ronald Johnson. Since then, we have published thirty-seven books by twenty-five authors. To learn more about the orgins of the press, see our interview with Martin Riker from a few years ago. To support the next decade, please consider becoming a sustainer of Flood Editions and make an ongoing, monthly donation. All donations are tax-deductible and go directly toward the publication of future books.

William Fuller Reading

In readings on January 19, 2011 at 12:32 am

Cheever Room, Finn House, Kenyon College

Thursday, February 10 at 4:10 pm

sponsored by The Kenyon Review

(forthcoming in March)

William Wylie Exhibition

In Uncategorized on January 14, 2011 at 1:22 am

William Wylie: “An Unfamiliar World,” photographs, February 4–26 (with an 0pening reception on Friday, February 4 from 7–9 PM). Page Bond Gallery, 1625 W. Main Street, Richmond, Virginia 23220. Wylie’s Route 36 is available from Flood Editions.

[William Wylie, Gazometri Rome, 2010]

Cold Poetry

In Uncategorized on January 3, 2011 at 10:27 pm

Adventure guide and filmmaker Solan Jensen has been reading Graham Foust’s Necessary Stranger at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole research station. Read more about Solan here.

Forthcoming and Upcoming in 2011

In forthcoming on January 2, 2011 at 3:08 pm

1) February: Roy Fisher’s Selected Poems, edited by August Kleinzahler. ISBN 978-0-9819520-6-2 $15.95.

Selected Poems presents the remarkable range of Roy Fisher’s restless and exploratory poetry. Stripped of ornament, skeptical in temperament, these poems find music in sharp angles, hesitations, and silences. They often move through post-industrial landscapes of Birmingham and the English Midlands, registering crepuscular half-tones, “the dog odour / of water,” and “malted-milk brickwork.” Beyond such literal subjects, Fisher captures the intermingling of fancy and perception, the play of light and shadow in the mind itself. As Kleinzahler suggests in his foreword to this volume, “The eye darts about in Fisher’s poetry. It abhors the object at rest, framing of any kind. It’s like a camera, jerking and swiveling on an unstable tripod. Early and late, the poetry is about the eye in motion. The shifts may be subtle or vertiginously abrupt. It’s best not to get too comfortable as you progress through a poem because you’re not going to be where you think you are for long.”

A Roy Fisher Symposium, hosted by  the Chicago Poetry Project, will be held on April 15–16. It will feature readings and talks by Maureen N. McLane, August Kleinzahler, and Tom Pickard.

2) March: William Fuller, Hallucination. ISBN 978-0-9819520-7-9 $14.95.

Hallucination negotiates between worlds of the living and the dead, shifting mercurially from verse to prose and from parody to parable. Along the way, Fuller draws our attention to the ineffable qualities of experience, proposing that “Matter is a fog one looks through toward pale headlights…” Through these glancing observations and surreal memoranda, the mysteries appear more vivid, our follies more desperate and absurd. “Secrecy Officer of American Poetry”—J.H. Prynne.

William Fuller will be reading at Kenyon College on February 10 at 4:10 pm. Details can be found here.

3) Also: Pam Rehm’s The Larger Nature, Thomas Meyer’s Kintsugi, and Basil Bunting’s Persia, edited by Don Share.

To support these publications: Please consider becoming a sustainer of Flood Editions, by making an ongoing, monthly donation to the press. All donations are tax-deductible and go directly toward the publication of future books.